Urban Partnerships for Poverty Reduction (Closed)

What is the project about?

safe water for slums
Access to services such as safe water and sidewalks in urban slums have improved the lives of millions across Bangladesh. Photo: UNDP Bangladesh

UPPR began its work in 2008 in coordination with its institutional partner, the Local Government Engineering Department (LGED) of the Government of Bangladesh. In the 23 towns and cities in which UPPR works, it does so jointly with the Municipality or City Corporation. The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) managed the implementation of the project, and UN-Habitat supported the component that works on improving the infrastructure and living conditions within the towns. Beyond the contributions of these actors, UKaid provided the majority of funding for the project.

Urban poverty in Bangladesh is commonly understood as a chronic, complex and problematic phenomenon related firstly, to a lack of skills and capacity for adaptation among a recently urbanized population, secondly, to the capacity and willingness of towns and cities to provide space for housing as well as public services appropriate to ever expanding number of urban citizens.

By developing the capacity of three million urban poor to plan and manage their own development, UPPR has worked to enable the poorest within the nation’s urban slums to break out of the cycle of poverty. UPPR aimed to reduce income and human poverty through the following four areas:

1. Urban poor communities were mobilized to form representative and inclusive groups and prepare community action plans;

2. Poor urban communities were supported to have healthy and secure living environments;

3. Urban poor and extremely poor people acquired the resources, knowledge and skills to increase their income and assets; and

4. Pro-poor urban policies and partnerships were supported at the national and local level.

Snapshots of key achievements

UPPR Map
The map shows he 23 towns and cities in which UPPR works, jointly with the Municipality or City Corporation.

 

• More than 800,000 households have joined 2,536 Community Development Committees (CDCs), which are mostly led by women. The 2014 Multi-Dimensional Poverty Index study noted a reduction in the incidence poverty as 23.5% of UPPR households now experience multidimensional poverty.

• A total number of 398,247 households have joined the Community Banking scheme since UPPR inception, including 98,156 households joining so far in 2015 alone. Community Banking provided these households access to credit through savings and credit groups (SCGs). Since January 2015, the savings balance across all the groups has increased by 7 percent and now stands at BDT 668 million (USD 8.7 million). Furthermore, the overall disbursement of loans throughout the duration of UPPR has reached USD 31 million.

• UPPR provided a Settlement Improvement Fund (SIF) to improve access to clean water and sanitation facilities. From 2008 to 2014, UPPR has financed 5,334 contracts for communities to improve their settlements, such as improved latrines, water-points, drains and footpaths. 246,891 households benefitted from improved access to water facilities and 187,101 households benefitted from improved latrines. 

• UPPR has supported the urban poor to establish livelihoods through: 1) 65,234 apprenticeship grants that provided women and men with training to help them gain skills and the necessary experience to find work; 2) 116,058 small grants that provided poor women the funds to start-up small businesses with the guidance of a mentor; and, 3) education grants provided for 111,146 school years for children of urban poor households towards achieving their primary and secondary school certificates.

• Since 2014, UPPR has actively engaged in establishing long-term partnerships with the private sector for formal employment and skills training. UPPR worked to link demand from companies for skilled and semi-skilled workforce with the supply of labour pool from poor urban settlements. Through these initiatives, UPPR aided a total of 3400 beneficiaries, of which 79% were female and around 58% came from extreme poor families. The areas for skills development training and employment include: the ready-made garments sector, computer and IT service sector, plumbing, sales, mobile repairs sector, electronics, switch and cable manufacturing and solar panel production.

• Community Housing Development Funds (CHDFs) have been established in 14 UPPR towns. Each CHDF is a fully established and sustainable town level institution that arranges loans and housing development for community members and serves as an innovative model that has successfully contributed to the improvement of tenure security and housing. 

• UPPR has piloted 5 different planning and land development models for tenure security and housing improvement. These models have been initiated by the Community Housing Development Funds (CHDFs) in Gopalgonj, Sirajgonj, Rajshahi and Chittagong. They include: 1) Resettlement in government land with long term lease (e.g. 99 years); 2) Land readjustment on privately owned land with mid-term lease arrangement; 3) On-site upgrading of housing on land owned by the households; 4) On-site upgrading of housing on land owned by LGI/organizations and 5) Building shelter houses for the homeless extreme poor in exceptional circumstances.

• UPPR was instrumental in establishing the Bangladesh Urban Forum. This is the only forum where urban stakeholders can share their views and shape pro-poor urban policies in Bangladesh.

 

Who finances it?



Fund

UNDP

DFID

Grand Total

Y-2007

237,299.37

216,494.85

453,794.22

Y-2008

(105,825.15)

4,312,887.27

4,207,062.12

Y-2009

1,867,223.60

8,966,712.79

10,833,936.39

Y-2010

1,112,850.64

11,667,390.96

12,780,241.60

Y-2011

 

19,035,938.63

19,035,938.63

Y-2012

587,258.39

21,023,949.60

21,611,207.99

Y-2013

786,674.64

22,945,697.06

23,732,371.70

Y-2014

10,311.01

11,849,264.01

11,859,575.02

Y-2015

304,814.64

4,655,851.09

4,960,665.73

Grand Total

4,800,607.14

104,674,186.26

109,474,793.40

 

Delivery in previous fiscal years

 

Year

Amount

2015

4,960,665.73

2014

11,859,575.02

2013

23,732,371.70

2012

21,611,207.99

2011

19,035,938.63

2010

12,780,241.60

2009

10,833,936.39

2008

4,207,062.12

2007

453,794.22

Project Overview
Status
Closed
Project start date
01 November 2007
Estimated end date
31 August 2015
Geographic coverage
23 towns across Bangladesh
Focus Area
Poverty Reduction
MDG
Goal 7, Target 11: a significant improvement in the lives of at least 100 million slum dwellers by 2020
Programme Officer
Ashekur Rahman
UNDP Project Manager
Sandrine Capelle-Manuel
Key partners
BRAC, Care, Coca-Cola, UNICEF, and World Vision.